This Week In Recovery: March 8, 2019

Posted by Joe Gilmore on Mar 8, 2019 11:00:00 AM
 
 

Welcome to This Week in Recovery, a weekly recap of the 5 biggest stories and developments in the recovery industry.

 

Study Shows Limiting Prescriptions Would Increase Deaths Initially - New York Times

A simulation study published by the American Journal of Public Health found that policies that, policies that limit opioid prescriptions would lead to an increase in deaths in the short term. However, over longer periods they will reduce the deaths by reducing the number of people who initiate in prescription opioids.

 

 

Construction Skills Help Kentuckians in Recovery Build New Lives - Public News Service

The Housing Development Alliance, a non-profit in Eastern Kentucky, has partnered with a local drug court and recovery center to provide on-the-job construction training for men and women in recovery. They'll be paid for their labor through federal and state grant funding. “They’ll be able to use us a job reference”, said executive director of the program, Scott McReynolds. “And we can say…’This person showed up on time every day...They are ready for you to take a chance on them.’”

 

 

Purdue Pharma Seeks Dismissal of Massachusetts Opioid Suit - Forbes

Purdue Pharma, the drug manufacturing company behind the most popular opioid in the county OxyContin, asked a Massachusetts court to dismiss the state’s lawsuit against it. The company said that the allegations of wrongdoing were “oversimplified scapegoating based on a distorted account of the facts.”

 

 

FDA Approves New Nasal Spray For Depression - NPR

The Food and Drug Administration approved that first drug that can be effective at quick relief of depression. The drug, Esketamine, can help to relieve depression in hours instead of weeks. "There has been a long-standing need for additional effective treatments for treatment-resistant depression, a serious and life-threatening condition," said Dr. Tiffany Farchione, a director in the FDA.

 

 

CDC’s Opioid Guidelines May Be Harming Pain Patients - Washington Post

More than 300 health experts this week told the Center for Disease Control and Prevention that the agency’s guidelines for opioids are harming patients who are dealing with long-term pain. They said that the CDC recommendation for a threshold on opioid use is obstructing insurers, pharmacies and doctors from providing these pain pills for their patients.

 

 

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Remembering a Life: Johnny Cash

With over 18 Grammy Awards and an induction into both the Country Music Hall of Fame and Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, Johnny Cash was a legend for his time. However, his career was fraught with heavy drinking and an addiction to prescription medication.

 

 

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